[GE users] asking about the meaning of slots

Simon Gao gao at schrodinger.com
Wed May 31 20:13:00 BST 2006


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Hi,

My understanding is that slot corresponds to the number of cpu on a
node. If a compute node has dual CPU or one dual core CPU, then there 
would be 2 slots for the node.  One way I use slots is to split slots
for different queues and then assign access to different users or groups
based on needs.

Simon


Daniel Templeton wrote:
> Yep.  And to override a slot value for a specific host or hostgroup,
> (add and) select the host/hostgroup in the panel on the left, click
> the lock icon next to the slots field, and then adjust the value, as
> described on page 49 of the admin guide.
>
> Good luck,
> Daniel
>
> laynejg wrote:
>> hi,
>>    Thanks a lot Daniel, I'll chew on this a little while but I think
>> that's what I wanted to know.  It may just be that I have to take
>> some nodes out of all.q to do what we're trying to do, which will
>> involve a lot of other head-scratching too.  Just one more thing, we
>> are talking about the "Slots" box on the Queue Configuration window's
>> General Configuration Tab, right?  Sorry to be picky, I'm feeling a
>> little overwhelmed and frazzled at the moment.  Thanks a lot!  Wow
>> what a quick reply, I love this mailing list.
>>     johnny
>>
>> Daniel Templeton wrote:
>>> Johnny,
>>>
>>> If the number of slots is 2, that means that every host in the
>>> cluster queue can run at most 2 jobs.  If there are three hosts,
>>> that makes 2*3=6 jobs total.  Be aware, though, that you can set the
>>> number of slots that a queue instance has, which overrides the
>>> number inherited from the cluster queue.  For example:
>>>
>>> I have two hosts, host1 and host2, and one queue, all.q.  all.q has
>>> both host1 and host2 in the host list.  That means I have one
>>> cluster queue, all.q, which has two queue instances, all.q at host1 and
>>> all.q at host2.  If all.q is set to have 2 slots, both queue instances
>>> will inherit that number, meaning that all.q at host1 and all.q at host2
>>> will both have 2 slots each.  If I then set all.q at host1 to have 4
>>> slots, that value will override the value inherited from all.q,
>>> leaving all.q at host1 with 4 slots and all.q at host2 still with 2, for a
>>> total of 6 slots.  If you were to run "qconf -sq all.q", you'd see
>>> the value of "slots" would be "2,[host1=4]", which means the default
>>> is 2, but host1 gets 4, just as described above.  Make sense?
>>>
>>> Hope that helps,
>>> Daniel
>>
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